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is we will reduce spending for $1 for every dollar that we raise the debt ceiling back in august 2011. that's what a lot of folks forget, alex, is that this is the last piece of the august 2011 debt ceiling agreement whereby the president, senate democrats and house republicans said, okay, let's raise the debt ceiling but for every dollar we raise that debt ceiling, we'll lower spending by a dollar. so i am in favor of keeping that agreement. >> but keeping that agreement, if the sequester goes into effect, according to the cbo, it says it will cut u.s. growth in half. it will cost at least 1 million jobs and jobs by extension, consumers, which drive the economy. don't you agree that losing 1 million jobs will be disastrous to the recovery? >> if you turn just to the cbo, the stimulus of three years ago would have solved all of our problems and we would not have had all the difficulties we have today. would have led to tremendous gdp growth. neither does the cbo ever report or take into consideration the impact the huge debt has on the growth of our gdp and job creation. we can have a
. the sequester is not a cliff. it's not a cliff, curb, drop, it's not a debt ceiling, it just begins on march 1st. it doesn't mean anything gigantic happens. the cuts will be spread out over the course of a year. you don't make them all at once, but it's bad. it's a bad way to run a government, bad way to cut spending. jared will tell you he thinks the gdp numbers will be revised up, and i think he might be right, but from what we saw, we had a shrinkage in the fourth quarter of 2012, first time in years. that's the first step towards a recession. we had very, very weak policy throughout the course of the recession, in large part because we've been cutting too much from spending, basically, from 2009. so to do a big cut of a size that nobody expected to actually go into effect, it's bad management for the macro economy, for large programs, of course, but that said and the recent notes of the market freaking out, it is not doomsday. we have a tendency in washington of wildly overhyping everything we do. this is not like the debt ceiling or even the fiscal cliff. this is not doomsday even if it doe
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2